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TOP 5 WORDS TO STOP SAYING IN YOUR SALON COMPANY

Updated: Oct 21, 2021



We’ve all heard the phrase, it’s not what you say it’s HOW you say it. Well, it turns out, it IS what you say…

In the professional beauty industry, the words we choose to use to communicate actually CREATE our culture. If you want a salon company that is exceptionally-led, highly-profitable, team-driven and sales oriented then you need to set your clientele and staff up for hearing what you are really saying.

  1. SALON COMPANY VS SALON

Saying “salon company” as opposed to “salon” seems like a minor tweak but think about this. When guests walk into your business, they have pre-conceived notions about what a salon does or doesn’t do. For example, their old salon allowed discounting, under the table pricing, random price increases, gossip… etc. When you introduce yourself as a “salon company” these notions begin to change to more of what is expected at a COMPANY. The biggest of which is promotions! When stylists receive promotions, this is expected and much more respected because you are a company. It becomes bigger than the guest.

  1. PROMOTION VS RAISE

When guests hear “raise” they immediately start thinking about what it’s going to cost them. How is it going to impact them and their bottom line. When they hear “promotion” they are more likely to think of an increase in their stylists STATUS in the salon, and how they EARNED a promotion. The increase in price will come up, but is not the focus of the conversation.

  1. RESERVATION VS PREBOOK

Pre-booking is a term we will classify as “backstage.” It doesn’t hold a meaning or value for your guests. Reservation, however, packs a punch! All of the greatest restaurants, shows and events require a reservation. It signals an elite status- and implies a high demand on your time.

  1. ONLY AN ADDITIONAL VS $10 MORE

It is important to always be up front and transparent about pricing. Nothing is more stressful for a guest than to be surprised at the checkout as to what their services cost. When we say, “only an additional,” as opposed to, “$10 more” we shift the focus FROM money to VALUE. This is also helpful when allowing guests to try out services complimentary- letting them know the normal price to add that service on.

  1. LIKE TO ENJOY VS LIKE TO TRY

This phrasing switch implies POSITIVE emotional response. In human psychology it is true that you can increase the likelihood of someone having a positive experience simply by telling them that it’s going to be positive. Additionally, the word “try” implies a level of risk- inviting your guest to contemplate if they will like it. Where using “enjoy” assures them that they will have a great experience.

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